The Wonderlic, Brought to you by The Victory Formation

I like movies with explosions (*nods at Michael Bay*), music that’s catchy (*tips cap to Kenny Chesney*), and food that’s fast and tasty (*smacks lips for Joey Bag of Donuts with chicken or steak, rice, black beans, cheese, lettuce, diced jalapenos, and plenty of Who is Kaiser salsa from Moe’s*).

All of the above are considered simple and uncreative by critics, and I would be scoffed at for admitting to being regularly entertained/satisfied by any of them in the presence of a movie buff, music expert, chef, and/or blog commenter.

You know what else I enjoy in a similar simplistic manner?  The 40-yard dash, the bench press, the vertical jump, and the Wonderlic testing at the NFL Combine.  Any banter involving one of these topics inevitably devolves into some form of “you’re an idiot because NFL scouts don’t give any weight to just the _______ (individual skills or aptitude test goes there) and consider all factors before deciding on a player’s draft position.”  And, those arguments are correct…but I’m not an NFL scout, and I’m amused by Andre Smith’s moobs flapping in the Indianapolis breeze and Vince Young requiring two attempts at the Wonderlic to change his score from embarrassingly below average to just below average.

Believe what you want about the Wonderlic.  The truth is that it wouldn’t still exist if it didn’t provide some measure of rating a player.  Regardless, many people have their own theories and aren’t afraid to share them.  For example, McDonald Mirabile wrote in his paper that there’s not a significant correlation between a quarterback’s passer rating and Wonderlic scores as well as no significant correlation between a quarterback’s salary and his Wonderlic scores. Additionally, a separate study by a bunch of dudes (Brian D. Lyons, Brian J. Hoffman, and John W. Michel) concluded that Wonderlic test scores failed to positively and significantly predict future NFL performance for any position and, in fact,  a negative relationship exists between Wonderlic test scores and future NFL performance for some positions (i.e. the higher a player scores at that position, the worse his performance will be in the NFL). Columnists have weighed in with their own theories on how to use the Wonderlic results.  I applaud these guys for their creativity.

Regardless of which side of the aisle you sit on with this issue, it’s obvious the Wonderlic matters if for no other reason than our own amusement.

It seems like every time the Wonderlic is discussed and player X is made fun of for being dumb while player Y scored remarkably well, people want to take the test to measure themselves against these guys and the scores that have been leaked and reported.  You probably know how well you’d do in the 40-yard dash (slooooow) or how many times you could bench 235 lb (ummmm…zero?), but do you know how well you would stack up against Bo Smith, Jay Cutler, or Mike Mamula in a battle of Wonderlic wits?  Well, today’s your chance to find out.  We’ve assembled questions for a Wonderlic exam (hat tip to Watsonian for access to a real test) and have devised a method for you to take it.  You can then compare your score to that of about 75 different football players scoring anywhere between a very, very low 4 and a perfect 50 (the below scores table was comprised of available reports of players’ scores…you may notice many are quarterbacks, because that’s the information that was most available).  I found conflicting number when trying to find the average football player’s score; it’s either 20 or 21.  So, the table below has the average set at 20.5.  Also, a Wonderlic score of 20 corresponds with an IQ of 100, and they even provide a formula to estimate IQ based on Wonderlic performance:

IQ = 2*WPT + 60, where WPT = your 50-question Wonderlic score.

First though, we need to go through a few rules and procedures.  The true Wonderlic given to prospective NFL players at the Combine is a 50-question paper test given over 12 minutes.  Our test is online, only 30 questions, and the time allowed is only 8 minutes.  However, this is still a valid Wonderlic exam. The Wonderlic website has an option to take a 30-question test with an 8 minute time limit.  To determine your final effective Wonderlic score, multiply your number of correct answers after 8 minutes by the factor of 1.667.  You can then adequately compare your score to the players scores table below.  I would suggest grabbing a sheet of paper, numbering it from 1 to 30, and writing down the letter of your answer beside each question you complete.

You may also be scratching your head about the 8 minute time limit.  Stop doing that, your scalp is sensitive.  If you use the 50-questions over a period of 12 minutes as your true time rule, then that would be an average of 4.1667 questions per minute.  Using that same rate, the Wonderlic should ask you 33 questions over 8 minutes instead of just 30.  So, you’re getting just a little more time (a few extra seconds per question) to answer the 30 questions.  The way we’re justifying our process as sufficient and comparable is by saying you’re going to have extra time involved in pages and polls loading that you wouldn’t if you were just using a pencil and paper.  So, un-wad your panties, because 8 minutes is reasonable.

Second, this is all honor system.  We have no timer to determine when your time is up and no counter to determine how many you actually answered correctly.  You’ll answer questions by voting in the poll just below each question, and you’ll also need to time yourself.  When your 8 minutes is up, stop answering questions, follow the link back to this post page at the bottom of whatever questions page you’re currently on, and check your answers against the correct answers listed below the players scores table.  Then, count up your correct answers and multiply by 1.667.

Feeling frisky enough to take the test?  Follow this link to begin with questions 1 though 5, and then the link at the bottom of that page to questions 6 through 10, and so on.  Good luck!


*Vince Young supposedly received a 6 after taking the Wonderlic his first time.  He then re-took it to earn his 16.  Yeeesh.  Oh, and yes, the “Dan Marion” is a typo…supposed to be “Dan Marino,” but I had already created the graphic from Excel when I noticed the error and didn’t feel like recreating it just to spell Marino’s name correctly.
**Yes, the academic pride of Florida, Chris Leak, did really get an 8.  But it’s not the kind of 8 you’re thinking of.  Leak supposedly only took a 12-question version of the Wonderlic.  Extrapolating his score out to a 50-question test results in an effective score of 33.  I’m burying this little factoid in the asterisks section because it’s just more fun talking about Chris Leak’s 8 than it is saying he got the equivalent of a 33.
***Ryan Fitzpatrick was rumored to have scored a 50 (a perfect score), but he himself denied that was possible saying he knew he left a question blank.  He did finish in roughly 9 minutes though, so that’s pretty impressive.
****Pat McInally owns the only confirmed perfect score of 50 among prospective NFL players.

Now, here’s the answers.  Again, count up how many you correctly answered in 8 minutes, and multiply that count by 1.667 to get your Wonderlic score to compare to the players scores above:

Some interesting notes…Almost all questions contained an a., b., and c. answer option.  So, if you’d just answered a. for everything, you would have gotten 8 questions correct and had a score of 13.  If you’d answered only b. for every question, you would have been correct 4 times for a score of 7.  And, similarly, if you’d answered c. for every question, you would have been right on 10 questions resulting in a final Wonderlic score of 17.  This was not planned; the answer options are listed in our TVF Wonderlic in the same order as the real Wonderlic we formatted our test after.  The average player scores a 20 or 21, so answering c. for all 30 questions would have almost been good enough for an average final Wonderlic score. 

So, now you know where you stand and can justifiably refer to your most hated or favorite players as dummies or geniuses in the future.  Use this knowledge carefully and have fun.  If you’re brave (and honest), drop your final score down below in the comments.

I’m certain that this is exactly what Eldon F. Wonderlic had in mind when he scribbled out the first Wonderlic text.  Oh, and by the way, Chris Leak got an 8.  Just sayin’…

Links back to all of the questions:

JUMP TO QUESTIONS 1 THROUGH 5

JUMP TO QUESTIONS 6 THROUGH 10

JUMP TO QUESTIONS 11 THROUGH 15

JUMP TO QUESTIONS 16 THROUGH 20

JUMP TO QUESTIONS 21 THROUGH 25

JUMP TO QUESTIONS 26 THROUGH 30

52 thoughts on “The Wonderlic, Brought to you by The Victory Formation

  1. I’ll be the blog commenter who scoffs at you

    /michael bay sucks

    I hope I didn’t offend you so much that you stopped at the end of the 2nd paragraph.

  2. this website has far too much /nodding, and /hat tipping, and Yer-ing for my tastes. Not to mention all the mother landing, whatever the hell that guy is always talking about.

  3. So, do I get a prize since i got them all right?

    No, but you are now black listed from the NFL for being too smart.

  4. No, but you are now black listed from the NFL for being too smart.

    Oh please, I was blacklisted long ago for being too fat. And for stalking Peyton Manning with a hammer.

  5. Oh please, I was blacklisted long ago for being too fat, unathletic, and injury-prone.

    Much more accurate.

  6. But you’re so scrappy Big D, and you have a huge motor, doesn’t that count for something?

  7. Not on topic, but my laptop wasn’t picking up my Wifi signal this morning, but when I plugged it right in the modem it worked no problem. Anybody know why that might be?

  8. Not on topic, but my laptop wasn’t picking up my Wifi signal this morning, but when I plugged it right in the modem it worked no problem. Anybody know why that might be?

    You turned the wifi off on your computer?

  9. I’m pretty sure I beat Vince Young, but some of those where a calculator does all the works are pretty hard, given my diminished capacity.

  10. I’m probably closer to Solomon Grundy in terms of a brainpower/Legion of Doom analogy.

  11. one thing that’s been bugging me, the answers where it’s “neither similar or contradictory”…shouldn’t that be “neither similar nor contradictory”?

  12. one thing that’s been bugging me, the answers where it’s “neither similar or contradictory”…shouldn’t that be “neither similar nor contradictory”?

    You know I didn’t even notice that

    /unobservant
    //sucks at grammar

  13. clay – I typed up those poll answers so I may have typed the “nor” in one on accident. the direct copy from the Wonderlic test says “neither similar or contradictor.”

    it should be “nor” though, right?

  14. oh, just the answer key is what is messed up. So the dummy is whoever made the excel spreadsheets. Probably Dan Marion.

  15. miz, if you’re going to address me directly, I want a /nod, or a /hat tip first, though I’d take a /curtsy.

    And sprinkle in a “yer” in your sentence, if at all possible.

  16. no, the same dummy that typed up the answers in the polls made up the answer key as well. it’s also the same dummy that typed Dan Marion and Joason Garrett.

    dude’s a real idiot.

  17. Looking at the list I slightly surprised that Steve Young didn’t score higher and am definitely surprised that Aikman scored as high as he did. Of course that was a preconcussed Troy

  18. Krenzal also seems low. Wasn’t he in an absurdly difficult major with a really high GPA

    Of course that was at Ohio State so I guess that helps…

  19. Of course that was a preconcussed Troy

    he got knocked out a bunch of times in college, too. I think it’s funny that people assume he’s stupid (as well as homosexual)

  20. don’t try to dictate the material in my comments. it’s not going to work.

    I’m trying to help you. The commenting grand prix is coming up, and you’ve yet to qualify.

  21. he got knocked out a bunch of times in college, too. I think it’s funny that people assume he’s stupid (as well as homosexual)

    I didn’t have an opinion on his intelligence until he got hired as an analysis where I’ve found him to be as asinine as Tim McCarver

  22. I didn’t have an opinion on his intelligence until he got hired as an analysis where I’ve found him to be as asinine as Tim McCarver

    I find there’s too much talking during my football games, unless I record them and watch them first. But I really don’t think it means the guy is stupid because he’s talking to a million somebodies who know less about football than I claim to.

  23. I’d have much less of a problem with Aikman if he didn’t start every analysis bit with “You’re absolutely right, Joe”.

  24. I got 25 of 30. Those math questions ruined me. Which would explain the reason I took the career path I did.

  25. I find there’s too much talking during my football games, unless I record them and watch them first. But I really don’t think it means the guy is stupid because he’s talking to a million somebodies who know less about football than I claim to.

    I don’t think he’s stupid at all, I think he’s doing what Fox tells him to: speaking to “Joe Sixpack,” who comprises the majority of their viewers. I’ll take Mayock or Collinsworth as an analyst over Aikman all day, but if you’ve ever seen Aikman in a setting outside an announcers’ booth with Joe Buck or an unfortunate Rent-a-Center commercial co-starring Hulk Hogan, the guy knows his football.

    As does Terry Bradshaw, despite my dig at his IQ. He called his own plays. Just ask him.

  26. We used to give the full version to employees desiring promotions to top paying hourly positions ($80,000 +) in the steel industry and if you didn’t score in the upper 20’s, low 30’s, you were pretty much screwed. But these folks did have very strong mechanical sense backgrounds and better than average math skills. Very few had any college though.

  27. he got knocked out a bunch of times in college, too. I think it’s funny that people assume he’s stupid (as well as homosexual)

    has anyone coonsidered that maybe enough concussions can make you a homosexual?

  28. has anyone coonsidered that maybe enough concussions can make you a homosexual?

    I heard Truman Capote was a junior Golden Gloves champion.

  29. I got 25 of 30. Those math questions ruined me. Which would explain the reason I took the career path I did.

    We got the same score! High five!

  30. 27/30 – score of 45. I have to believe that the lowest guys just didn’t care when they took this – they knew (save Bradshaw) – they knew they were going to be rich. As a 49er fan, too bad Alex Smith’s score didn’t translate to success…

  31. 29/30 for a 48.3 adj. I can’t imagine that would equate to a 156 iq. That was too easy of a test.

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